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Carton & Item Label Evaluation

Model for Standard Electronic Item Records (Instructions in PDF)

Model for Standard Electronic Item Records (Sample File in Excel)

Slide Shows

Linking Inventory Management and Supply Chain Control (A101)

Sunrise 2005 (Global Bar Code and Numbering) (A206)

Guidelines for Product ID, Labels and Shipments (GPID)

Executive Overview

Product Identification Labeling and Shipment

Vital Items Checklist

Supply Chain Foundation Guide (SCF)

1. Introduction – Information flow in the supply chain, How to use the documents

2. Supply Chain Overview & Benefits

3. Organizing The Labeling Project

4. Understanding the GS1 System

Label Implementation Guide (LIG)

5. Implementing GS1 Labeling Project

6. Implementing Serial Shipping Container Code

7. Bar Code Print Quality

 

 

Pet Industry Guidelines for Product ID, Labels and Shipments (GPID)

1.0 Labeling and Shipping Standards for Manufacturers

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Product Identification Using the U.P.C. for Item, Inner Pack and Master Pack

1.3 Data Files To Communicate U.P.C. Numbers

1.4 Carton Packing

1.5 CARTON LABELING: Product Identification and Shipping Label

1.6 Packing Slip Preparation

1.7 Selling Unit Packaging Requirements

1.8 Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

1.9 Product Safety and Product Safety Labeling

1.10 Shipment Packaging and Pallets

1.1  Introduction

1.1.1  This document provides further explanation of the guideline and identifies the standards necessary to help you move your merchandise through the hobby industry supply chain including retail stores and distribution centers.

1.1.2  In order to move products through the supply chain we must be able to identify the products and then match the physical product and shipment to the related transaction information.  This means that we must have a standard method to identify products and shipments including the bar codes and labels.  We must also have a standard to deal with methods of communicating information about shipments and the individual items contained in the shipment.

1.1.3  In this section we will explain a standard for a "hard copy" form to provide information about the individual item that will be used in a variety of database applications and another "hard copy" form to provide shipment information (manifest).  The forms will serve as models so that manufacturers and their customers can explain the elements of information that they each need in order to conduct business.  Trading partners can establish their own methods to electronically communicate the elements of information identified on the standard forms.

1.1.4  This section will also explain carton labeling.  We would like to remind the reader that there are two kinds of labels found on cartons.  One identifies the product that is contained in the carton the other provides shipping information. In fact there are a number of elements essential to driving costs out of our supply chain. They are:

  • Product identification numbers (GTIN) and shipment identification.
  • Standard Item Records (SIR) containing information about a specific SKU.
  • Complete and accurate paperwork (forms and electronic files)
  • Proper carton and inner pack quantities
  • Complete and accurate label information
  • Use of strong packaging materials

1.2  Product Identification Using the GTIN for Item, Inner Pack and Master Pack

1.2.1  Every item that is to be sold must have a unique product identification number using the standards established by GS1 (Uniform Code Counsel (UCC)).  The guidelines require this product identification method that includes item identification, inner-pack and master-pack.

10.2.2  If this is your first involvement or if you need an overview we suggest that you review the entire guidelines.

1.3  Standard Item Record (SIR) To Communicate GS1 (Formerly the U.P.C. Numbers)

1.3.1  The product identification number that is found in the bar code is used to access different data files in computer systems. Therefore manufacturers must be able to provide some fundamental information in an electronic form. This electronic file must contain, at a minimum, the product identification number found in the bar code, the product catalog number, the description, the package quantity and package dimensions. Various trading partners may require other information about specific items. It is strongly recommended that companies discuss the “Standard Item Record” with their trading partners.

1.3.2  Distributor and retailer inventory master files must be matched to the manufacturer’s file using the GTIN number as a starting point (because of new global capabilities, the GS1 now refers to the product identification number as the global trade item number (GTIN). This is part of a movement to harmonize all retail item numbers called Sunrise 2005. An important point must not be overlooked. After the initial matching, then the files must be maintained. This maintenance is called synchronization. Any time something changes in a product master file (controlled by the manufacturer) the item master files throughout the supply chain must be synchronized with the manufacturer’s file. Therefore it is important to have two capabilities, one for start-up matching and the other for ongoing synchronization. The column heading (or titles) of the standard item record (SIR) become a key that is used to relate the information in the records of one company to the information contained in the records of another. A row is added to the customers spread sheet (“User Field Names” shown in yellow) The SIR numbers and titles are shown in the column of the corresponding information. See field definitions in 1.3.3 below.

The example of a simple spreadsheet shows how the data required by several different customers can be matched to the SIR column titles. These examplers were taken from the craft and hobby supply chain. Contact your trading partner for the latest, up to date records.

1.3.3  Below we have provided an example of the standard item record (SIR) using an Excel™ spreadsheet. The example shows the elements of information that a retailer can expect to be contained in the item master file. The elements of information are arranged in the rows in this example so that they can be seen on one page. The Excel™ spreadsheet that can be downloaded for FREE. is set up with the information elements in columns since that arrangement is easier to be imported by a computer. NOTE: The field numbers and names are the same in both layouts. The field names, at the top of the columns, must not be changed since they are directly related to the XML tags. To help users reference their own field names, a row is provided “User Field Names.” User can enter their own filed names into those cells.

The spreadsheet serves as a model to help companies communicate with their trading partners. Using Excel™ enables the least sophisticated companies to communicate with even the most sophisticated. Even the least sophisticated company can import and export Excel™ format. Of course, the most sophisticated can use the Excel™ files. The advanced user can employ XML tags (Excel 2003™) that enable many different computers and software systems to automatically load and interact, in real time, over the Internet. (.Net and Web Services)

Please be aware that trading partners may have additional data requirements based on customer / vendor relationships that are not specifically shown in here. Those other elements can be provided in any of the eight “Generic” fields shown. Microsoft Excel is the standard format for data sharing.

  • Size This column describes the size of data field.

  • Type “a” represents alphabetic “n” represents numeric “a/n’ represents alpha numeric

  • Value “m” represents mandatory “o” represents optional “r” represents recommended

Database Record Format

 

 

Name of Field

Size

Type

Value

Description

Example

 

KEYS

 

 

 

 

 

1

EAN / U.P.C.

13/12

n

m

See Note #1

073650151613

2

Information Provider #

8

n

o

See Note #12

1123

3

Information Provider

35

a/n

m

See Note #2

Notions Marketing Corp

4

Brand Owner

35

a/n

o

Name of Company that owns the Brand

Dyno Merchandising Corp

5

Brand Name

35

a/n

o

Name recognizable by consumer

Coats & Clarks

6

Full Description

30

a/n

m

Primary Description See Note #9

Thread, Poly/Cot 25yd Lt/Dk

7

Abbrev. Description

20

a/n

m

Short: for consumer cash receipt & shelf label

Thread, Lt/Dk 25yd

8

Description (additional or extra)

60

a/n

o

Long Description, not extension of #5 or #6

Mercerized Cotton Covered Polyester Thread 12 spls 25yds Lt/Dk

9

Manufacture's SKU #

20

a/n

m

Product # usually as found on retail package

B640 C

10

Distributor's SKU #

20

a/n

o

Distributor assigned identification number

21667

11

Retailer's SKU #

15

a/n

o

Retailer assigned identification number

38-12345

 

DIMENSIONS

 

 

 

 

 

12

Consumer Purch Unit

2

a/n

m

ea=each, yd=yard, ft=feet

ea

13

Unit Linear Height

5.3

n

o

See Note #3

7.47

14

Unit Linear Width

5.3

n

o

See Note #4

3.17

15

Unit Linear Depth

5.3

n

o

See Note #5

0.95

16

Unit Gross Weight 

5.4

n

o

See Note #6

0.0106

17

Min Orderable Qty

6

n

m

 

3

18

Inner Orderable Unit

6

n

o

Qty of consumer purch. items in inner pack

3

19

Inner Pack GTIN

14

n

m

See Note #13

20073650151617

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20

Case Orderable Unit

6

n

o

Qty of consumer purch. items in case pack

120

21

Case Pack GTIN

14

n

m

See Note #13

40073650151611

22

Case Height

5.3

n

o

See Note #10

15.25

23

Case Width

5.3

n

o

See Note #10

11.625

24

Case Depth

5.3

n

o

See Note #10

13.875

25

Case Gross Weight

5.3

n

o

See Note #11

15.54

 

DATES

 

 

 

 

 

26

Publication Date

8

n

m

See Note #7

 

27

Effective Start Date

8

n

m

See Note #8

 

28

Change Indicator

1

a

m

a=Add, c=change, u=Update, d=Discontinued

 

29

Last Change Date

8

n

o

ex: yyyymmdd

20040131

 

MISCELLANEOUS

 

 

 

 

 

30

Mfg Suggested Retail

8.2

n

m

MSRP Price of consumer level unit

3.55

31

Unit Cost

8.3

n

o

ex: 2.125  Cost of single consumer purch. unit

1.598

32

Inner Cost

8.3

n

o

Total cost of quantity of units in inner pack. 

4.794

33

Case Cost

8.3

n

o

Total cost of quantity of units.  Ex: 74.160

159.72

34

Country of Origin

2

a/n

o

ex: us=USA, uk=United Kingdom

TW

35

Int’l Tariff Code

10

n

o

ex: 1234567890

9608.00.0000

36

Generic

*

n

o

Size & Use determined by Trading Partners

 

37

Generic

*

n

o

Size & Use determined by Trading Partners

 

38

Generic

*

n

o

Size & Use determined by Trading Partners

 

39

Generic

*

n

o

Size & Use determined by Trading Partners

 

40

Generic

*

a/n

o

Size & Use determined by Trading Partners

 

41

Generic

*

a/n

o

Size & Use determined by Trading Partners

 

42

Generic

*

a/n

o

Size & Use determined by Trading Partners

 

43

Generic

*

a/n

o

Size & Use determined by Trading Partners

 

Standard Item Record Format Notes

Note #1 Most people are familiar with the GTIN 12 item bar code (12 digits formerly the U.P.C.). Products from outside North America use a compatible bar code called the GTIN 13 (formerly EAN - 13 digits) Either number can be used in this field. Note that there have been some changes to the number structure. You do not need to change any U.P.C. item numbers. See note 13

Note #2 A name of the person or organization; i.e. Manufacturer, Distributor, Broker providing this information.

Note #3 The measurement of the height of the trade item at its vertical dimension from the lowest extremity to the highest extremity, including the packaging in inches to the third decimal. Measure as if description label is readable from left to right in most common way of display.

Note #4 The measurement of the width of the trade item at its horizontal dimension from the left extremity to the right extremity including the packaging in inches to the third decimal. Measure as if description label is readable from left to right in most common way of display.

Note #5 The measurement of the depth of the trade item at its most extreme depth in inches to the third decimal. Measure as if description label is readable from left to right in most common way of display.

Note #6 The gross weight includes all packaging materials of the trade item measured in pounds to the fourth decimal.

Note #7 The creation date on which all static data associated with the trade item becomes available for viewing and synchronization. (Ex: yyyymmdd)

Note #8 A date when the buyer can first order the item. (Ex: yyyymmdd)

Note #9 Full Description; this should be the Primary Description of this product and sufficiently detailed to distinguish it from other products.

Description may be up to 30 characters including spaces, commas, periods, dashes or any other special characters. In order to be an effective description, store employees need to be able to tell what the item is. Therefore, begin with a broad category description then identify the color, dimensions or style. In addition, in many systems the customers only see the first 15 characters of the description on the register receipt, so the first characters need to define the category of product. Below you will find some examples of good and bad descriptions.

Good Descriptions      

Bad Descriptions

Brush, Camel Hair Rd 3 

#3 Round

T-Shirt, Large Blue

Lg Blue T-Shirt

BK, Floral Spring Arrangements

Spring Arrangements

Wire,  Wild Blue,  4 yard           

4 Yd Blue Wire

Note #10 The measurement of the height, width and depth of the shipping carton measured in inches.

Note #11 The gross weight of the shipping carton, its contents and any packing or void fill.

Note #12 The numeric representation of the provider of the data as defined by the trading partners.

Note #13 Global trade item number (GTIN) Higher levels of packaging, above selling unit (see field 1) should be presented as a 14 digit GTIN. The various numbering systems have been harmonized as part of UCC Sunrise 2005. If you have more than three levels of packaging, eg. Item, carton master, use generic fields (36 through 43) for GTIN followed by dimensions.

1.4 Carton Packing

This section deals with packing merchandise for transit to distribution centers as well as shipments direct to stores. First, we must explain the configuration terminology and requirements.

1.4.1  Product Packing Configurations

The packing configurations will define the lowest level of store selling unit (each), how many “eaches” will be packed as a group (inner pack), and finally how many eaches and inner packs are in a master case.

Most major retailers will work with the vendor’s existing production standards to promote manufacturing efficiencies for the vendor, and distribution efficiencies for the retailer.  When the configurations are defined, they must remain consistent throughout the product’s lifecycle.  Do not ship in the new configuration prior to reaching approval from your trading partner.

1.4.2  Single SKU in Cartons

Each shipping carton should contain only one SKU, unless the order is a specific assortment requested by your trading partner.  However, there may be some deviations from this normal rule.  Be sure to discuss this with your trading partner. Each different packing level or configuration will have a different 14 digit GTIN.

1.4.3  Inner Pack / Storage Case

The inner pack or storage case quantity is the total number of selling units grouped together in a “bundle”.  Several bundles or inner packs may exist in a master pack.  The product is usually grouped inside of bags, smaller cartons or plastic wrap.  The inner pack quantity must be consistent for the same SKU for all orders.

1.4.4  Master Packs

A master pack quantity is the total number of selling units (eaches) within the master case.  The master pack quantity must be consistent for the same SKU for every order.

1.4.5  Packaging

Typically distribution centers will select individual units, inner packs, master packs and even full pallets to fulfill store inventory demands.  Whenever possible, products should be packaged in corrugated cardboard boxes.  The following standards should be applied whenever possible.  It is recognized that there are rare exceptions when the product size or shape does not allow for packaging in corrugated cardboard boxes.  These exceptions should be discussed with trading partners for approval prior to shipment to the distribution centers or stores.

  • Selling units (“eaches”) each carrying a GS1 12, 13 or 8 bar code should be packaged based on trading partner requirements when the product was first set up with the buyer.  However, additional filler material may be required to protect the merchandise from soiling, breaking or deteriorating.  Biodegradable materials are preferred for filler material.

  • Inner packs and/or storage cases:

    • Each must carry a 14 digit GTIN presented in GS1-128 bar code. To allow the distribution centers to use conveyor systems, many retailers prefer that the packaging for all inner packs and/or storage cases that are at least 5”H x 4”W x 2”L  and weigh at least 2 lbs. be a shippable carton. 

    •   Merchandise which measures less than 11”H x 11”W x 16”L and is not packed in a shippable inner pack carton may be overpacked with other merchandise for shipment to the store inside a repack box. The packaging used must be sufficient to protect the merchandise from damage or soiling as it is handled and shipped to the stores in the repack box. 

    • Some distribution centers and retailers have re-pack boxes of specific dimensions. It is important that you discuss your packaging capabilities and their requirements.

  • Inner packs/storage cases for Seasonal or Special Event Merchandise:   

    • Inner pack / storage case quantities for seasonal merchandise must be packaged together in shippable containers within the master pack. 

    • Some retailers have very specific requirements about the nature of inner packs/storage cases and seasonal merchandise.  Make sure that you understand their requirements if any exist.

  • Master packs must carry a 14 digit GTIN presented in GS1-128 bar code.  Merchandise should be protected in a shippable carton that can be transported and handled without tearing or breaking.  Shrink-wrap, plastic bags, or straps may not be acceptable for master carton packaging for some retailers.  Fragile merchandise should be packed with material that allows the cartons to be transported from the vendor’s site to the final destination without damage.  If breakage is common for certain merchandise, the vendor will need to take steps to improve the method or type of packaging.  Typically, the cardboard quality must be 175-pound test corrugated to protect your merchandise.

  • Seal the carton using polypropylene film (plastic) box-sealing tape, glue and/or staples.  Do not use paper tape that utilizes a water-based adhesive to seal your boxes.

  • It is extremely important that the size of the carton selected for a SKU remains consistent for all orders.  The distribution centers allocate storage space based on the original carton size and quantity of the cartons.  If merchandise allows, shipping cartons should be within the dimensions listed in the table below.  This allows the distribution centers to process merchandise via conveyor systems.

  •   Use of plastic or metal banding may be prohibited on all master cartons, inner pack boxes and pallets being shipped to a number of retailers.  If your merchandise is exceptionally heavy or dense, you should contact the trading partner to request an exception to this rule.

1.4.6  Proper Packaging Summary:

It is your responsibility to ensure product is packaged to prevent damage or loss.  Do not ship your goods without the correct protection.  Below are some basic guidelines for proper packaging.

  • Use a carton of at least 175 pound test strength

  • Use adequate cushioning material

  • Secure with polypropylene film tape designed for shipping

  • Affix proper labels to each carton as described in the section on carton labeling requirements

  • The shipping label must display a complete return address

  • Be sure to discuss the use of metal or plastic banding to secure master cartons, inner pack boxes, or pallets with your trading partners if you intend to use them

1.5 CARTON LABELING: Product Identification and Shipping Label

This section deals with carton labeling.  We would like to remind the reader that there are two kinds of labels found on cartons.  One is for product identification telling what is contained in the carton; the other carton label is the shipping label.

Figure 1 – Product Identification and Shipping Label Location

Notes:

This is to be the location for the label described in Figure 2 and the Shipping Label in Figure 3 (when placed on an individual inner-pack or master carton).

1.      Labels should wrap around and be in the lower left quadrant of the short side of the master carton.

2.      The area from the bottom to the top of the carton and 7 inches back from the corner is reserved for this application. No other labels are to be placed there but carton graphics are permitted.

3.      If manufacturers must use a second label for internal systems, the second label must be as close to the top of the carton as possible to avoid confusion.

4.      The bottom of the product ID label should be parallel to the bottom of the case.

5.      If the master carton is not high enough for a shipping label to be placed above the master carton label, place the shipping label in the area to the right of the master carton label on the short side of the master carton.

1.5.1  Product Identification Label Specifications

Figure 2 – Product ID Label With Bar Codes (not to scale)

  1. Label Purpose – To be used on a single container (either master carton, storage case, or inner-pack) holding one or more items with a single part number.
  2. The Carton Product Identification Label design is based on the bar code label standards developed by the Uniform Code Council (UCC).
  3. The “Global Trade Item Number” (GTIN) as it is referred to by the GS1 is contained in the bar code. The GTIN is the primary method of product identification. It is the number used in the item master file and the number used to identify each product shipped on the manifest, packing slip or electronic file called an ASN.
  4. All bar codes use GS1-128 symbology. The bar code will have a minimum height of ½ inch. 
  5.  The preference is for the shipping label to be located in close proximity to the master carton label on the short end of the master carton (See Figure 1).
  6. The mandatory blocks of information are the manufacturer, the description and the GTIN bar code with human readable information below it.  The other blocks are optional but should be agreed to by the trading partners to avoid any confusion on the part of employees who must handle and identify the products.
  7. All print fields should be left justified and centered vertically within each block of data. 
  8. Fonts shall be in upper case bold Arial or Arial Narrow, or equivalent.
  9. Each block of data on the label will have a human readable block definition. The minimum recommended Font Sizes by the Uniform Code Council are:
    • 9 pt is equivalent to 0.125 (1/8”) in height for block identification
    • 36 pt is equivalent to 0.500 (1/2”) in height for other text
  10. Please note the above font sizes are nominal and may need to be adjusted depending on your printer software.
  11. There is a preference to print a box around each of the individual blocks of data on the label.
  12. There may be a preference for a wrap around product identification label.  The wrap around label may be printed on a single label or two separate labels.  When two separate labels are used, the labels should be located on adjacent sides of the carton in the assigned space.  With a wrap around label, the right half is to be a mirror image of the left half.  All of the field positions are reversed.  For example, in Figure 2, the blocks containing the optional, quantity, description and GTIN bar code fields will be on the right for the left label, and on the left for the right label.
1.5.2  Shipping Label

Different retail stores and retail chains may have a variety of different logistics systems. For example, some vendors may be shipping to stores; others may be shipping to distribution centers.  Below is a model of the shipping label to carry the most fundamental of information.  Manufacturers should discuss specific needs with their customers since there may be a requirement for some additional or slightly different information based on the specific logistics system.

  • Overview of Label Layout
    An important bar code standard has been approved by ANSI (American National Standards Institute).  The standard is called American National Standard for Materials Handling - Unit Load and Transport Packages - Bar Code Symbols (henceforth referred to as ANSI MH10.8). The standard is important because it makes it easier for companies and industries to develop comprehensive shipping label specifications using a format developed and maintained by an internationally accepted standards-setting body … ANSI.

  • ANSI MH10.8 Framework
    ANSI MH10.8 is a guideline or "framework" for developing shipping label specifications.  The MH10.8 addresses all the important issues of a standard and it simplifies the process of developing a shipping label specification (not product identification labels; mentioned earlier). This guideline has used this framework to develop its model label.

    • The label consists of three key segments: 1) the customer segment, at the top of the label 2) the carrier segment, beneath it and 3) the supplier segment at the bottom.

    • Each segment is divided into blocks and each block can be divided into sub-blocks.

    • Separator lines delineate the blocks and vertical separators designate sub-blocks.

1.5.3  Shipping Labels

Regardless of whether the shipment is an express shipment, LTL, or even a truckload, the vendor must affix a label, at least 4” x 6” in size, with information found in the example below on each carton in the shipment. 

Label Example

Table 2:  DC Shipping Labels Block and Content Requirements and Recommended Block Dimensions and Text Formats

1.5.4  Application of Shipping Labels to Shipping Containers

All shipping labels must be legible and complete, with shipper and consignee information corresponding with the bill of lading.  For shipments sent directly to the stores, the lead carton (box #1 in the shipment) containing the Packing Slip should be clearly marked “Packing Slip Enclosed”.  For shipments being sent to a distribution center, the packing list must be affixed to the outside of the lead carton or pallet in an envelope marked “Packing Slip Enclosed”.  For truckload shipments, attach the envelope to a pallet at the rear of the trailer.

Guidelines for placing labels are shown below.  You must affix the label to the side of the box if the dimensions of the box allow.  However, if the box size does not allow the entire label to be affixed to the side of the box, you may place it on the top of the box.

1.6 Packing Slip Preparation

A packing slip is required for all shipments to retail stores, distribution centers and third-party facilities.  The packing slip contains critical information to properly identify and receive merchandise at stores and distribution centers.  Retailer employees use this information to help identify, sort and confirm merchandise quantities.  Retailer Accounts Payable departments also use packing slips as supporting paperwork for vendor payments.  Packing slips must reflect the actual shipment contents.  Missing packing slips or inaccurate information on a packing slip causes delays in receiving which prevents the product from being placed in inventory or made available for sale to a customer.  These types of errors could also delay payments to vendors.

For shipments going to a distribution center, packing slips should be securely affixed to the lead carton or pallet inside an envelope marked “Packing Slip Enclosed”.  For shipments going directly to the stores, the lead carton should be marked as containing the packing list.

Packing slips are always in paper format and must be included with each shipment of merchandise.  Below is a model manifest (packing slip).  Not all packing slips will be the same for all vendors.  The model should be used to help vendors and customers understand each other’s needs and capabilities to provide the necessary information.  The minimum required information should be presented in a format that is legible and organized for efficient receiving.

Please note: A separate packing slip is required for each purchase order within the shipment.

1.6.1  Packing List / Manifest (see Description of Fields)

1.6.2  Description of Fields

FIELD

TYPE

CONTENT

1

Text

Form Title : MANIFEST or PACKING LIST ( Large font size )

2

Data

Order Number (for internal use)

3

Data

Date

4

Data

Page number/Total pages

5

Data

Carrier ID

6

Data

Country / Point of Origin

7

Data

Manifest Number

8

Data

Ship To Address

9

Data

Routing Information

10

Data

Shipping schedule : scheduled ship date, scheduled arrival date

11

Data

Customer Purchase Order Number

12

Data

Terms

13

Data

Date Loaded

14

Data

charge Class

15

Data

Mileage

16

Data

Trailer ID

17

Data

Trailer Seal Number

18

Text

Free text area for internal use

19

Data

Total number of unit loads

20

Data

Total number of extra pieces

21

Data

Total quantity in each units

22

Data

Total cubic feet

23

Data

Total weight

24

Text

Title Field : ITEM NUMBER

25

Text

Title Field : ITEM DESCRIPTION

26

Text

Title Field : QUANTITY

27

Text

Title Field : UNIT LOAD

28

Text

Title Field : EXTRA

29

Text

Title Field :COUNT

30

Text

Title Field : VARIANCE

31

Text

Title Field : TOTAL WEIGHT

32

Data

UPC/GTIN

33

Data

Item Description

34

Data

Quantity each

35

Data

Quantity of unit loads

36

Data

Quantity of non unit loads

37

Data

Total quantity of units for this line item

38

Data

Any difference from ordered quantity

39

Data

Total weight of this line item

40

Text

Title Field : TOTALS

41

Data

Column total for Quantity

42

Data

Column total for Unit Loads

43

Data

Column total for Non Unit Loads

44

Data

Column total for total units

45

Data

Column total for Variance

46

Data

Column total for Total Weight

47

Text

Free text area for handling instructions

10.6.3  Example

1.7  Selling Unit Packaging Requirements

1.7.1  Introduction to GS1 (formerly U.P.C.) Selling Unit Labeling

Most retailers will accept item marking and labeling as provided by the manufacturer.  However some of the large retailers have developed specifications for item labeling.  In order to provide some guidance we have selected a range of specifications to serve as a model.  If you have not applied GS1 barcodes to your items we suggest you use the following models.  If you have applied GS1 labels to your products and they differ from this model we suggest that you review your trading partner’s requirements.

All products sold in the supply chain are required to display a GS1 bar code. The bar code on each item must meet GS1standards that ensure the bar code can be scanned using optical scanning equipment. The GS1 must also include the 12 or 13-digit series of numbers beneath the bars that presents the encoded information in a human readable format. Vendors should validate that every item shipped actually scans at the register in the retail store. Non-compliance to GS1 bar code standards can result in your product being removed from retail stores. It is recommended that all vendors install scan-audit equipment to ensure that their bar codes on all items shipped scan accurately. It is further recommended that verification equipment specifically designed to analyze bar code quality be used. When this equipment is used bar codes should rate a level "C" or better using ANSI standard method of quality evaluation. Listed below are the minimum GS1 standards required.

Do…

  • Assign a GTIN number that is unique to each item

  • Assign a separate GTIN number for each color, size and package

  • Print or securely affix a GS1 12, 13, or 8 bar code to each selling unit

  • Comply with GS1 size requirements:

    • 1.020” X 1.469”

    • Maximum reduction factor – 80%

    • Maximum expansion factor – 200%

    • Truncation no less than ½” high

    • Allot 0.25” blank space on both sides of the symbol to prevent the optical scanners from picking up stray markings

  • Print the GS1 bar code in black ink on a white background

  • Never print in red

  • Make sure bar codes are printed clearly – no smudged or faded ink

  • Ensure easy access to the bar code symbol by the optical scanner 

  • Place the bar code on the bottom, right-hand corner of the selling unit or packaging

  • Include human-readable digits beneath the bar code symbol on all products

  • Verify that the bar code scans properly prior to shipping.

  • Submit notification of GTIN changes to customers at least 60 days in advance

  • Assign a new GTIN bar code on new items or items that are changed significantly

Don’t…

  • Use a new GTIN when making price changes

  • Recycle a GTIN that has been used on a different current or discontinued item

  • Assign a unique GTIN to differentiate place of manufacture or a date code

For more information, consult the rest of the guidelines.

1.7.2  Blister Pack Merchandise

Labeling Requirements:

The retail price and SKU/Article number should appear on the top-right corner on the front of the header card, unless otherwise directed by your trading partner.

The retail price, if required should appear above the SKU/Article number.

The GS1 number should appear on the back of the header card.

Packaging Requirements:

All blister pack products should be placed inside a standard pack/carton for shipping (e.g. do not ship items “loose” or “as is”).

Pack only one SKU/Article per standard pack/carton (except for agreed to and approved assortments).

1.7.3  Boxed Merchandise

Labeling Requirements:

The retail price and SKU/Article number should appear on the top of the box, unless otherwise directed or agreed to with the customer.

The retail price should appear above the SKU/Article number.

The GS1  number should appear:

  • On the bottom of the box for small boxes that can be handled with one hand.

  • On the side of the box for boxes that require both hands for handling.

Packaging Requirements:

All boxed merchandise should be placed inside a standard pack/carton for shipping (e.g. do not ship items “loose” or “as is”).

Pack only one SKU/Article per standard pack/carton (except for customer approved assortments).

1.7.4  Floral Bushes, Picks and Stems

Labeling Requirements:

The retail price, SKU/Article number and GS1 bar code should be placed on the silk floral bush stem using a butterfly sticker.

The butterfly sticker should be placed high on the product between the branches to prevent the tag from tearing or falling off.

The tag should be a heavy, pliable gum label to withstand the rigors of display and customer handling.

The retail price should appear above the SKU/Article number.

The plastic sleeve commonly placed over the silk floral bush during shipping is thrown away prior to Store display. Therefore, do not sticker the plastic sleeve on silk flowers.

Dried flowers, however, are displayed in the plastic sleeves. In this case, the SKU/Article, GS1 and retail price stickers should be placed on the plastic sleeve.

Packaging Requirements:

All floral merchandise should be placed inside a standard pack/carton for shipping (e.g. do not ship items “loose” or “as is”).

Pack only one SKU/Article per standard pack/carton (except for customer approved assortments).

1.7.5  Framing and Non-Boxed Framed Art

Labeling Requirements:

The retail price, SKU/Article number and GS1  label showed be placed on a sticker attached to the back of the merchandise, unless otherwise directed by the customer.

The retail price should appear above the SKU/Article number.  Be sure the sticker is removable and does not damage the product.

Packaging Requirements:

All framing/framed art product should be placed inside a standard pack/carton for shipping (e.g. do not ship items “loose” or “as is”).

Pack only one SKU/Article per standard pack/carton (except for customer approved assortments).

1.7.6  Furniture

Labeling Requirements:

The retail price, SKU/Article number and GS1  label should be placed on a sticker attached to the back of the merchandise, unless otherwise directed by the customer.  If the merchandise will be damaged by a sticker, a hangtag should be attached, providing the retail price, SKU/Article number and GS1.

The retail price should appear above the SKU/Article number.  Be sure the sticker is removable and does not damage the product.

Packaging Requirements:

All furniture product should be placed inside a carton for shipping (e.g. do not ship items “loose” or “as is”).

It may not always be practical to use cartons for some oversized furniture products.  For these items, special arrangements should be made with the customer.

Pack only one SKU/Article per carton (except for customer approved assortments).

1.7.7  By-The-Yard (Reels/Spindles)

Labeling Requirements:

The SKU/Article number, vendor style number, GS1 and number of yards should be labeled on each reel/spindle under any plastic wrap.

The retail price label should be included with the Packing List to each Store.

Packaging Requirements:

All  by-the-yard product should be placed inside a carton for shipping (e.g. do not ship items “loose” or “as is”).

Pack only one SKU/Article per carton (except for customer approved assortments).

Product should be shipped according to the negotiated size.

Product shipped in a “sleeve” should be securely sealed.

1.7.8  Other

Labeling Requirements:

For all other hard items:

  • The retail price, SKU/Article number and GS1 should be placed on a sticker attached to the back of the merchandise.  Be sure the sticker is removable and does not damage the product.

  • The retail price should appear above the SKU/Article number.

For merchandise sold in bags;

  • The retail price, SKU/Article number and GS1 should be placed on a sticker on the bag or pre-printed on the bag.

  • The retail price should appear above the SKU/Article number.

  • The SKU/Article number and the retail price should appear on the front top-right corner of the merchandise bag.

  • The GS1 should appear on the backside of the bag.

  • If the merchandise cannot be seen because the sticker covers the merchandise, place all labels on the backside of the merchandise.

  • Plastic bags less than .001 inches thick should contain the following warning statement:

WARNING: KEEP THIS BAG AWAY FROM BABIES AND CHILDREN.  DO NOT USE IN CRIBS, BEDS, CARRIAGES AND PLAYPENS.  THE THIN FILM MAY CLING TO NOSE AND MOUTH AND PREVENT BREATHING.

For merchandise sold in cylindrical containers (e.g. tins, paints, cans):

  • The retail price and SKU/Article number should be placed on the front.

  • The GS1 should be placed on the backside, bottom or top.

  • For merchandise that is used by the consumer for decorating purposes (e.g. decorative holiday tins), the markings should be on the bottom.

  • The retail price should appear above the SKU/Article number.

For ready-to-wear merchandise (e.g., sweatshirts, costumes):

  • The retail price, SKU/Article number and GS1 should be on the same hangtag that contains the product information such as size, color, style and vendor.   

  • The retail price should appear above the SKU/Article number.

  • Finished Garments/Ready-to-Wear merchandise should be shipped in a clear plastic bag. Plastic bags less than .001 inches thick should contain the warning statement listed in the labeling instructions above.

                

Packaging Requirements:

  • All product should be placed inside a standard pack/carton for shipping (e.g. do not ship items “loose” or “as is”).

  • Pack only one SKU/Article per carton (except for customer approved assortments).

  • Product should be packed appropriately as to ensure saleable merchandise at the Store.

1.8  Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

1.8.1  General

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has developed a basic Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) form in an attempt to establish a common database for each hazardous chemical used in the United States. While companies are not required to use the OSHA form, they are required to maintain the same information contained on those forms for any hazardous substances that they produce.  OSHA defines a hazardous material as any substance that has a physical or health hazard, considering available scientific evidence. It is the responsibility of the manufacturer or vendor to perform a hazard determination or assure that an appropriate hazard determination is conducted on your product to determine if the product requires an MSDS.

1.8.2  Requirements

An MSDS should be provided for each hazardous material or for each good containing any hazardous material supplied to a customer. Each MSDS describes:

  • Description of the chemical

  • Name and location of manufacturer or distributor 

  • Why the chemical is hazardous

  • Risks and conditions if exposed to the substance(s) 

  • Safe-handling procedures 

  • Protection guidelines for working with the substance(s)

  • What to do if you are exposed

  • How to handle a spill or emergency

The MSDS should be provided to the customer prior to the time of first shipment, at any time information changes on the MSDS, or any time that customer requests an MSDS. You should also provide an MSDS for any sample product that presents or contains a physical or health hazard prior to the time that the sample product is shipped to the customer.

It is also the responsibility of the manufacturer or vendor to ensure that any product shipped to the customer bears an appropriate label in accordance with OSHA’s hazard communication standard. OSHA requires the manufacturer, importer or distributor to ensure that each hazardous substance is labeled, tagged or marked with its identity, appropriate hazard warnings and the name and address of the manufacturer, importer, or other responsible party. Upon request, the customer should be provided with an appropriate label.

1.9 Product Safety and Product Safety Labeling

1.10 Shipment Packaging and Pallets

1. Carton Packaging

  • Use a carton of at least 175 pound test strength

  • Use adequate cushioning material

  • Secure with polypropylene film tape designed for shipping

  • Be sure to discuss the use of metal or plastic banding to secure master cartons, inner pack boxes, or pallets with your trading partners if you intend to use them

  • Product with sharp edges should be wrapped with bubble wrap before placing in container

  • Do not use peanuts or paper fillers unless approved by retailer

  • Weight over 40lbs – Label for two-person lift required. (Graphic may be requested)

2. Pallet Requirements & Stacking Guidelines

  • Palletize > 300lbs if not going directly to store.

  • Pallets less than 50” double stack.

  • Pallets less than 34” will triple stack.

  • Pallet should not exceed 84” in height including pallet.

  •   Product should not hang over pallet

  • Pallet Types – Grade A-B grocery manufacturers approved 48”x40# standard four way pallet.

    • Grade A – New pallet free of defects

    • Grade B – Used with minimum amount of reinforced or corrected spots

    • Secured by placing shrink-wrap around pallet

    • Minimal cardboard or banding may also be used to secure shipment.

  • Consolidation of one or more SKU same order allowed on pallet keeping SKU’s packed together on same pallet.

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